“From a riders perspective, the Tour de France is really the pinnacle of the sport,” Simon said. “It’s obviously the highlight of the season for so many people and it’s such an important race.”

As Simon Gerrans lines up for the opening time trial of the 2015 Tour de France in Utrecht on Saturday it will mark his tenth start at the world’s biggest cycling race.

The decade of racing at ‘Le Tour’ is highlighted by two-days in the Malliot Jaune in 2013 and two stage wins, the first in 2008 and second in 2013.

On the eve of his return, Gerrans discusses his condition and what will make a successful 2015 race.

“I am feeling really good now,” Simon said. “Obviously this season has been a real rollercoaster for me so far but I finally feel like I have got some good days racing in my legs and my form is just where I want it to be coming into what is probably the most important race of the year for the team.”

“It’s funny, the Tour de France seems to either go spectacularly well or spectacularly bad, there never seems to be any middle ground.

“For me, a good Tour de France is to go for a stage win, that’s the ultimate achievement.

“But staying up out of trouble and being involved in a competitive ORICA-GreenEDGE line up – going for my select stages and then being a good teammate and helping out the other guys for their opportunities – that will be the ideal Tour.”

His ORICA-GreenEDGE team as a whole oozes with opportunity.

“As far as the team’s perspective goes, we have got a really exciting group of guys going to the Tour de France,” Simon said.

“And it’s a group of guys that will hopefully see us be competitive through the full three weeks of the Tour de France – from some select finishes in the first week, to breakaways in the middle mountain stages in the second week, to some opportunist moves in the high mountains in the third week of the race.

“I think it’s a really well-rounded group and a group that is very competitive on all fronts.”

21 stages make up a total of 3360km of racing across three countries – Holland, Belgium and France – between July 4 to 26. The Tour de France is demanding, both physically and mentally, but it’s the height of professional racing.

“From a riders perspective, the Tour de France is really the pinnacle of the sport,” Simon said. “It’s obviously the highlight of the season for so many people and it’s such an important race.”

“The racing is at the highest level of the season, everybody is motivated and everybody is under pressure to get a result so it’s super competitive.

“Like I said, when things are going well and you can ride that wave, there is no better race to be at.”